Police Transparency

The Overland Park Police Department serves the community with integrity by treating every individual with whom we interact fairly, lawfully and professionally.

This page includes information, link and policies that openly define our processes, philosophies and accountability measure that ensure we provide the best service possible.

In most cases, links to policies and procedures will direct you to a library of all Overland Park Police Department Standards of Conduct and Standard Operating Procedures.

Anti-Biased Policing

Racial or other biased-based policing is unethical, unlawful and unacceptable. It fosters community distrust of law enforcement and it will not be tolerated or condoned by any Police Department staff member. The Overland Park Police Department is committed to non-biased policing.

Officers and other Police Department staff are required to report any incidents of biased-based policing to their supervisors. Supervisors are responsible for maintaining awareness for actions, patterns or practices of possible discriminatory treatment, to include reviewing complaints and reports and analyzing traffic and pedestrian stop data.

Training

New officers receive initial biased-based policing training while attending the Police Academy, pre-academy training or post-academy departmental training.

All officers receive, at a minimum, annual training on issues related to racial or other biased-based policing. Training includes but is not limited to training relevant to racial or other biased-based policing.

The Police Department uses the nationally-recognized Fair and Impartial Policing training

Filing a Complaint

File a complaint or inquire about the complaint process in the following ways:

In Person
Visit the Myron E. Scafe Building, 8500 Antioch, or the Sanders Justice Center, 12400 Foster. Once inside the lobby, pick up the red phone and request to speak to a police supervisor.

Email
Send a message directly to the Professional Standards Unit at pdprofessionalstandards@opkansas.org.

OPCares
Send a message directly to staff using the City’s online customer service center, OPCares.

Over the Phone
Contact the shift commander’s desk phone:

Contact dispatch at 913-895-6300 and request to speak to a police supervisor. Or, contact a specific police station:
W. Jack Sanders Justice Center (South station) – 913-327-6893, select option #3
Myron E. Scafe Building (North station) – 913-895-6293, select option #3

You may also contact the Professional Standards Unit directly at 913-327-6736.

Racial and bias-based policing complaints may also be made directly to the Office of the Attorney General. Visit the Attorney General’s website for more information.

Expect an acknowledgement of a compliment or complaint within three business days. Complainants are welcome to contact the Office of Professional Standards at any point to inquire about the status of an investigation.

Reporting + Resolution

The Office of Professional Standards thoroughly investigates all racial or other profiling or bias-based policing complaints, and forwards completed investigations to the Chief of Police for review and disciplinary followup.

The Independent Citizen Advisory Board for Racial Profiling and Non-Biased Policing advises and assists in policy development, education and community outreach and communications related to racial profiling and other non-biased policing efforts of the Overland Park Police Department and meets quarterly. Any complaint alleging biased based policing by a member of the Overland Park Police Department is reviewed by the Board.  All meetings are open to the public. During meetings, the board may recess into executive session to hear details of each investigation. The board will return to open session to announce its findings.

The Office of Professional Standards compiles and maintains a report on such cases and their resolutions, which is submitted to the Kansas Attorney General’s Office annually. These reports are available on the attorney general’s website.

Related Policies

Arrest Data by Demographic

The City of Overland Park is a destination for not only residents, but visitors, workers, students, and others. More than five million people visit our city every year, and more than 100,000 people commute into Overland Park every day from throughout and outside the metropolitan Kansas City area.

While the population demographics in the tables below are based on Census groups, Overland Park Police Department services are available to all who are in our city, no matter how long they stay.

The figures below are for 2021. Community and metropolitan demographic data is from the US Census Bureau American Community Survey, 2022.

2021 Arrests by Race
Race Overland Park Population Total Overland Park Population Percentage OPPD Arrest Total OPPD Arrest Percentage
White 147,999 75.04% 3027 68.01%
Black or African American 9,068 4.60% 1310 29.43%
American Indian and Alaska Native 694 0.35% 7 0.16%
Asian 18,368 9.31% 56 1.26%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 101 0.05%
Some Other Race 5,037 2.55%
Two or more Races 15971 8.10%
Unknown 51 1.15%
Total 197,238 100.00% 4,451 100.0%
2021 Arrests by Sex
Sex Overland Park Community Total Community Percentage OPPD Arrest Total OPPD Arrest Percentage
Unknown -% 13 0.3%
Male 97647 49.5% 2950 66.3%
Female 99466 50.5% 1488 33.4%
Total 197113 100.0% 4451 100.0%
2021 Arrests by Age
Age Overland Park Population Total Overland Park Population Percentage OPPD Arrest Total OPPD Arrest Percentage
Less than 20 48382 24.55% 1075 24.16%
21-30 28529 14.47% 1342 30.16%
31-40 30726 15.59% 1062 23.87%
41-50 25213 12.79% 564 12.67%
51-60 20600 10.45% 275 6.18%
61 and older 43663 22.15% 132 2.97%
Total 197113 100.00% 4450 100.00%
Related Policies

Body-Worn Cameras

More than 200 officers working in patrol, community policing, school resource, traffic and emergency wear body cameras while on patrol.

Department Use

Cameras can capture audio and video anytime the camera is powered on. The cameras are also capable of activating automatically when an officer’s patrol car’s lights and sirens are activated, decreasing the number of steps required for documentation in an emergency.

Video recordings are kept for various lengths of time depending on the classification of the recording. Equipment checks and day-to-day patrol operations are kept for 30 days. Video of incidents involving a response to resistance, complaints, arrests and other incidents are kept permanently.

The Police Department spends approximately $93,000 per year for data storage of body-worn cameras. The hardware and maintenance are negotiated up front at the time of purchasing and are separate contractual costs. The City has $2.75 million budgeted in the 2023-2027 Capital Improvements Program for the replacement of body worn camera hardware.

Related Policies

Budget

The Overland Park Police Department’s budget is part of the City of Overland Park’s overall annual budget.

Police Department Budget

The department’s 2023 budget is $47,115,807. This funding supports 24/7 patrol operations training, investigations, school resource officers, traffic safety, tactical operations, the professional standards office, administration and much more.

Overland Park Police Department’s funding also supports proactive services and programs such as community policing, school resource officers, crime-free multi-housing programs, victim support services and more.

The Overland Park Police Department and City of Overland Park understand there are calls regarding diverting funds from police departments and reallocating them to non-policing forms of public safety.

Our department has recently increased training and partnerships in areas to assist with navigating complex social issues, including behavioral health, substance abuse, homelessness, veteran crisis intervention, youth outreach and more. The Department has allocated $100,000 specifically to trauma induced care training in 2022.

Related Policies + Links

CALEA Accreditation

The Overland Park Police Department first earned accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies in 2018, and has maintained compliance and accreditation each year after that. The department was recognized with re-accreditation in 2022.

What is CALEA?

CALEA serves as the “gold standard” for public safety accreditation. CALEA was was created in 1979 as a credentialing authority through the joint efforts of law enforcement’s major executive associations:

  • International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
  • National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE)
  • National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA)
  • Police Executive Research Forum (PERF)

The following information is from the CALEA website:

CALEA serves as the premier credentialing association for public safety agencies and provides accreditation services for law enforcement organizations, public safety communication centers,
public safety training academies, and campus security agencies. The standards are promulgated by a board of 21 commissioners, representing a full spectrum of public safety leadership. The assessment process includes extensive self-assessment, annual remote web-based assessments, and quadrennial site-based assessments. Additionally candidate agencies are presented to the Commission for final consideration and credentialing.

Accreditation Process

CALEA Accreditation is a voluntary process and participating public safety agencies, by involvement, have demonstrated a commitment to professionalism. The program is intended to enhance organization service capacities and effectiveness, serve as a tool for policy decisions and management, promote transparency and community trust, and establish a platform for continuous review.

Each year that the department is renewing its accreditation, we host CALEA assessors who verify compliance with accreditation standards. During this visit, the assessors invite the community to a public meeting, and collect written comments, regarding our services to the community.

CALEA Accreditation is the Gold Standard for Public Safety Agencies and represents a commitment to excellence.

Related Policies

Community Engagement

The Overland Park Police Department invites the community to be involved in policing and get to know our officers and staff.

There are a variety of ways for residents, visitors and others to engage with the department.

Citizens Police Academy

The Citizens Police Academy program educates residents about the basics of the police profession. With this knowledge, residents can return to their neighborhoods and improve the relationship between the community and the police department.

OPPD On The Road

In 2021 and 2022, we hosted several in-person events across Overland Park for members of the community to learn more about specific units within the department.

Accreditation Meetings

Each year that the department is renewing its accreditation, we host CALEA assessors who verify compliance with accreditation standards. During this visit, the assessors invite the community to a public meeting, and collect written comments, regarding our services to the community.

Ride-Alongs

We invite anyone who is interested in learning more about the Overland Park Police Department and its operations to ride along with an officer.

Coffee with a Cop

The Community Policing division regularly invites neighborhoods and areas of the community to Coffee with a Cop events. These localized events build community relationships by providing neighbors an opportunity to ask questions specific to their ward, and giving officers a chance to share important, neighborhood-focused safety information in a face-to-face format.

National Night Out

National Night Out is an annual community building campaign that promotes positive community policing partnerships and neighborhood camaraderie. Overland Park police officers and other City staff meet with neighbors in multiple locations for conversation, meals, demonstrations, live music and more.

Explorer Program

The Explorer Program teaches life skills while promoting awareness of law enforcement operations and involvement in the community, to local high schoolers.

School Resource Officers

An extension of our community policing program, school resource officers build important relationships with Overland Park middle and high school students, ensuring a safe learning environment for everyone.

Police Station Tours

Tours include overviews of department operations and services and arrest and court procedures. Visitors may tour most areas of the station unless active investigations are taking place.

Request a Tour

Police Department Social Media

Followers can get regular updates about the work our officers are doing to make Overland Park a safer place to live, work, and play on the Overland Park Police Department social media accounts.

Crime Prevention Presentations

Anyone can request an Overland Park police officer for a presentation regarding safety and security in and around the home. These presentations are available to HOAs, neighborhood groups, businesses, social organizations and others.

Request a Presentation

Security Surveys

The department’s crime prevention unit can provide security surveys of individual homes and businesses, making recommendations to increase safety.

 

Annual Reports

Read the Department’s annual report and watch a message from the chief to learn more about the Overland Park officers who work to keep the City safe.

Annual Report

Boards, Commissions + Committees

Meetings for these resident-led groups that review and make recommendations for Police Department operations are open to the public.

Governing Body Meetings

While the Police Chief and all City staff report to the City Manager, the City Council sets legislative and policy priorities through its committee-based meeting system.

Public Safety Committee – The City Council Public Safety Committee oversees the policies and programs of the Police Department. Meetings are open to the public and are streamed live online, and generally include information briefings about ongoing operations, and action items regarding implementation steps of Police Department business.

City Council Meetings – All business from the City Council Public Safety Committee ultimately continues on to City Council meetings. Many items include public hearings, and the City Council meeting includes an open public comment period at the beginning of each meeting, where anyone who would like to speak to the Governing Body as a whole can do so.

See Agendas

Compliments + Complaints

Overland Park Police staff work to provide professional services and compassionate support to everyone we encounter. Staff are expected to manifest the City’s core values of integrity, service commitment, respect, stewardship, relationship building and pursuit of excellence in the work we do.

There are high expectations for all who work within the Overland Park Police Department, and we welcome your feedback. Please visit the Compliments + Complaints page to learn more about these processes.

Filing a Complaint

Filing a Complaint

The Overland Park Police Department formally investigates allegations and inquiries into police conduct in order to

  • Protect members of the community from misconduct by an employee.
  • Protect the department and employees who conduct themselves appropriately.
  • Identify policies and procedures that may need review or change.
  • Find ways to improve the quality of our service to the community.

File a complaint or compliment, or inquire about the complaint/compliment process in the following ways:

In Person

Visit the Myron E. Scafe Building, 8500 Antioch, or the Sanders Justice Center, 12400 Foster. Once inside the lobby, pick up the red phone and request to speak to a police supervisor.

Email

Send a message directly to the Professional Standards Unit at pdprofessionalstandards@opkansas.org.

OPCares

Send a message directly to staff using the City’s online customer service center, OPCares.

Over the Phone

Contact the shift commander’s desk phone:

Contact dispatch at 913-895-6300 and request to speak to a police supervisor. Or, contact a specific police station:

  • W. Jack Sanders Justice Center (South station) – 913-327-6893, select option #3
  • Myron E. Scafe Building (North station) – 913-895-6293, select option #3

You may also contact the Professional Standards Unit directly at 913-327-6736.

Expect an acknowledgement of a compliment or complaint within three business days. Complainants are welcome to contact the Office of Professional Standards at any point to inquire about the status of an investigation.

Racial and bias-based policing complaints may also be made directly to the Office of the Attorney General. Visit the Attorney General’s website for more information.

Investigation Process

The police department’s internal affairs unit will accept and thoroughly investigate all complaints of alleged misconduct, bias, or racial profiling.

  1. A supervisor or detective will take an initial statement from the complainant and forward it to the internal affairs unit to follow up.
  2. The involved employee and any other police department witnesses will be required to respond to the allegation.
  3. The office of professional standards commander and the involved employee’s division commander will review the investigative results.
  4. The Independent Citizen Advisory Board for Racial Profiling and Non-Biased Policing will review complaints of biased policing or racial profiling, and provide the police chief with its recommendation.
  5. The chief or a designee will reach a final decision regarding the complaint disposition.
  6. The final disposition will be communicated in writing to the complainant and the involved employee.

Ensuring a fair and impartial decision on any complaint often requires many steps, so we appreciate your patience and support during the complaint investigation and review process.

Related Policies

Crime Mapping

The Overland Park Police Department partners with many local police departments to share crime data on the Community Crime Map.

Because Overland Park is a significant part of the Kansas City metropolitan area and Johnson County, it is beneficial to review crime data comprehensively across the region.

The Community Crime Map also connects law enforcement with the community to reduce crime and improve public safety.

Crime mapping helps members of the public get a better idea of the crime activity in their area so they can make more informed decisions about how to stay safe.

The Community Crime Map goes beyond crime mapping by automatically alerting the public about recent crime activity and by improving communication between the public and law enforcement through anonymous tips.

Community Crime Map empowers the public to make better decisions about crime by putting the same technology used by law enforcement to analyze and interpret crime activity into the hands of the public.

Community Crime Map

Cultural Humility

The Overland Park Police Department strives to learn about and be a part of the variety of groups within the community we serve and how we can better offer our services in a culturally-appropriate way.

Community Partners

We continue to examine our own understanding of the community and learn from one another and our community partners. The department has strong relationships with a variety of community organizations focused on cultural advocacy, including:

  • Johnson County NAACP
  • Olathe NAACP
  • Advocacy and Awareness Group of Johnson County,
  • Jewish Community Relations Bureau|AJC,
  • Shivaii Maharai Antarrashtriva Parivaar, 
  • Autism Society The Heartland,
  • Pakistan American Society of Greater Kansas City,
  • Dialogue Institute of Kansas City, and others.

Many training programs available to members of the department involve lessons in cultural humility, including the department’s regular required anti-bias training, the City’s internal talent development program, external leadership programs and more.

Related Policies

De-Escalation + Response to Resistance

The use of force in law enforcement is an issue of critical concern nationally, in the Overland Park community and among law enforcement. 

Whenever possible and appropriate, an Overland Park Police officer’s first step is to de-escalate a situation. If that is not possible, officers may use the degree of control or force reasonably necessary to ensure a safe outcome.

Our officers are required to report all use of force. These reports are analyzed at the department level as well as provided to the FBI for public reporting purposes on its Crime Data Explorer tool.

De-Escalation

De-escalation techniques can reduce the need for use of force and keep both members of the public and police officers from getting hurt in a confrontation.

De-escalation techniques may include:

  • Providing a warning,
  • Verbal persuasion and advice,
  • Stabilizing a situation through time, distance or positioning,
  • Requesting additional or specialized personnel to respond, and more.

Overland Park Police Department officers are trained on de-escalation techniques and philosophies through the Integrated Communications Assessment and Tactics training from the Police Executive Research Forum, at least annually. All officers received eight hours of Force Science training on de-escalation in 2022.

Oversight

In cases where an officer uses deadly force or discharges a weapon, the Chief of Police and members of the administration are immediately notified and a number of steps occur, including:

  • In situations involving personal injuries or possible criminal charges, administration may determine the need to activate the Johnson County Officer Involved Shooting Investigation Team. 
  • The Chief of Police convenes an internal board of review to aid in continuing evaluation of policy and procedure.

Critical incidents that involve police officers from a Johnson County law enforcement agency are investigated by the Johnson County Multi-Jurisdictional Officer Involved Shooting Investigation Team. OISIT is a group of trained professional investigators from law enforcement agencies across Johnson County. While the Overland Park Police Department does have members that serve on the Officer Involved Shooting Investigation Team, those members do not participate in investigations which involve Overland Park officers.

Related Policies

Diversity

The Overland Park Police Department values diversity and the perspectives diversity brings to the community and our operations. Our department strives to mirror the demographics of the community we serve. The information below provides a snapshot of our representation as compared to the Overland Park community.

Police Department By Race
Race Overland Park Population Total Overland Park Population Percentage OPPD Total OPPD Percentage
White 147,999 75.0% 209 84.6%
Black or African American 9,068 4.6% 13 5.3%
Hispanic 17 6.9%
Asian 18,368 9.3% 3 1.2%
American Indian and Alaska Native 694 0.4% 2 0.8%
Some Other Race 5,037 2.6% 3 1.2%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 101 0.1%
Two or more Races 15,971 8.1%
Total 197,238 100.0% 247 100.0%
Police Department by Sex
Sex Overland Park Population Total Overland Park Population Percentage OPPD Total OPPD Percentage
Male 97647 49.5% 206 83.7%
Female 99466 50.5% 40 16.3%
Total 197113 100.0% 246 100.0%
Police Department by Age
Age Overland Park Population Total Overland Park Population Percentage OPPD Total
OPPD Percentage
Less than 20 48382 24.5% 0 0.0%
21-30 28529 14.5% 62 25.2%
31-40 30726 15.6% 79 32.1%
41-50 25213 12.8% 56 22.8%
51-60 20600 10.5% 46 18.7%
61 and older 43663 22.2% 3 1.2%
Total 197113 100.0% 246 100.0%
30x30 Campaign

The Overland Park Police Department has signed the 30×30 pledge.

Our ultimate goal is to increase the representation of women in police recruit classes to 30% by 2030, and to ensure police policies and culture intentionally support the success of qualified female officers throughout their careers.

The 30×30 pledge encourages agencies to report on their efforts to identify and address the obstacles that female officers face in recruitment and throughout their careers.

The 30×30 pledge is a flexible framework that encourages agencies to share their stumbling blocks while also celebrating their victories. A key goal of the progress reports is to help foster knowledge sharing throughout the 30×30 network and beyond. From these reports, participating agencies will share promising practices, learn from one another, and develop programs and initiatives to address barriers to women’s advancement.

Related Policies

Ethics

All Overland Park police officers agree to follow a code of ethics when they take their oath of honor. This code provides fundamental guidance for employees and the expectations of conduct and duty performance for all members of the Overland Park Police Department.

Code of Ethics

Our code of ethics reads:

“As a law enforcement officer, I will uphold the constitutional rights of all to liberty, equality and justice. My fundamental duty is to serve the community; to safeguard lives and property; to protect the innocent against deception, the weak against oppression or intimidation and the peaceful against violence or disorder.

I will remain calm in the face of danger, scorn or ridicule; exhibit self-restraint; and be constantly mindful of the welfare of others. Honest in thought and deed both in my personal and official life, I will be exemplary in obeying the law and the regulations of my Department to prevent bringing discredit to me or to my agency. Whatever I see or hear of a confidential nature or that is confided to me in my official capacity will be kept ever secret unless revelation is necessary in the performance of my duty.

I will never act officiously or permit personal feelings, prejudices, political beliefs, ambitions, animosities or friendships to influence my decisions. I will enforce the law without bias, fear or favor, malice or ill will; never employing unnecessary force or violence and never accepting improper gratuities.

My badge is a symbol of the public’s faith in me. I accept this as a public trust to be held so long as I am true to the ethics of police service. I will never engage in illegal acts, nor will I condone such acts by other police officers. I will cooperate fully with those in an official capacity in the pursuit of justice.

I am responsible for my own standard of professional performance and will enhance and improve my level of knowledge and competence. I will constantly strive to achieve these objectives and ideals, dedicating myself to my chosen profession… law enforcement.”

Additionally, ethics training is required for all department employees at least every two years.

Related Policies

Hiring Process + Standards

The Overland Park Police Department’s diligent hiring process ensures our officers uphold City values of integrity, service commitment, respect, stewardship, relationship building and pursuit of excellence. In addition to the requirements and process below, we look for candidates with a heart for service, a drive to excel in an organization full of opportunities, and a desire to become part of something bigger than themselves – the Overland Park community.

Hiring Requirements

Minimum qualifications for candidacy for officer positions in the Police Department include:

  • US citizenship
  • 21 years or older
  • Have a high school diploma or GED
  • Pass a background check
  • Live within 90 minutes of the Police Department
  • Take and pass a physical agility test, written examination and interview

Additional elements can disqualify candidates from hire, which are considered on a case-by-case basis.

Selection Process

When candidates are considered for employment with our department, this is the typical hiring process:

  1. Recruiter outreach
  2. Application
  3. Physical agility test
  4. Polygraph exam
  5. Criminal background check
  6. Records check
  7. Oral Board Interview with command staff
  8. Meeting with the Police Chief
  9. Pre-employment drug test
  10. Pre-employment psychological and medical exam

To learn more about the department’s hiring process or apply for a position, visit the OPPD Careers page.

Related Policies

Mental Health Services

Overland Park Police Department officers train annually on best practices for helping members of the public in crisis and strive to provide services that keep all people safe during interactions with people with mental illnesses.

Overland Park Crisis Action Team

On an average day, the Overland Park Police Department responds to at least seven calls for service per day involving mental health issues.

The Overland Park Crisis Action Team, OPCAT, provides mental health-related and trauma-informed support during these emergency calls.

The OPCAT includes specially-trained Crisis Intervention Team Specialists and mental health co-responders from Johnson County Mental Health. OPCAT also includes a K9 officer, Haven. Haven provides peer support to the Overland Park Police Department and the community, and respond to calls for service with OPCAT.

OPCAT Specialty Training areas include veteran crisis intervention, youth outreach and elderly outreach.

CIT Training

In addition to OPCAT members being available to respond to mental health calls as needed, we are striving to ensure as many officers as possible have the tools they need to assist anyone in a mental health crisis.

As of November 2022, more than 60% of the Police Department have completed crisis intervention team training, a 40-hour course focused on improving communication, identifying mental health resources for those in crisis and ensuring officer and community safety. The Overland Park Police Department receives CIT training courses through the Johnson County Mental Health Department.

It is our hope to have all police officers CIT trained in the coming years.

Related Policies + Resources

Officer Wellness

The Overland Park Police Department is committed to providing officers with the appropriate resources and support during their day-to-day operations, and especially following a critical, unusual, or extreme event. Caring for our staff in this way not only promotes safer policing, but creates better working environments for our teams and assists with their return to routine functioning.

Employee Assistance Program

The City offers a voluntary Employee Assistance Program to help employees deal with personal problems which can affect job performance. Professional services are offered free of charge to encourage employees and their immediate family members to take advantage of this service.

Peer Support Program

The Peer Support Program offers assistance and support resources to any Police Department staff member, whether on or off duty, when personal or professional problems arise.

Peer support specialists provide emotional support to members who express a need for assistance during and after times of personal or professional crisis. They promote trust, allow appropriate anonymity and preserve confidentiality for persons using the Peer Support Program within the guidelines. The Peer Support Specialists provide guidelines or referrals to professional or alternative resources as appropriate. They check on the status of those injured on duty or ill, and provide support when desired or needed.

Police Chaplains

Clergy members who are part of the Overland Park or Kansas City community can apply to become department chaplains and provide spiritual assistance to members of the department or the public who would like support.

Clergy members are required to successfully pass a background check and polygraph examination, and are ultimately approved by the Chief of Police.

Department Psychologist

A department psychologist with expertise working with law enforcement officers provides oversight into the Police Department’s peer support program and serves on an internal advisory committee. The psychologist is also available to consult with team specialists on mental health issues and referrals, if additional support is needed.

Physical Fitness

Law enforcement job functions require physical readiness. All Overland Park police officers are required to be capable of safely and effectively performing all duty assignments without undue risk to themselves, other officers and the members of the public.

In order to promote both job readiness and additional health benefits, officers are encouraged to be physically healthy.

Officers are required to complete a timed obstacle course located at the Johnson County Police Academy annually. The course has been validated by an independent firm specializing in employee surveys and testing and assessment systems.

Related Policies

Police Reform Alignment

The Police Department understands there are calls nationally for police and criminal justice reform. The information below includes the Overland Park Police Department’s response and alignment to individual reform recommendations.

Governor’s Commission on Racial Equity and Justice
Recommendation Response
If law enforcement is utilized in school districts for any purpose, districts should create sustainable partnerships and formalize Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between school districts, law enforcement agencies, and stakeholders. We have contracts with Blue Valley, Shawnee Mission, and Saint Thomas Aquinas.  The specifications of the relationship are already included in these agreements.
If law enforcement is used in schools, institutions should provide training to SROs, including but not limited to restorative justice, anti-racism, implicit bias training, and school-based strategies to support social and emotional health and de-escalation. We collaborate with our school partners in the selection of SRO’s.  In addition, restorative justice, anti-bias, and de-escalation training are part of our mandatory training for all OPPD officers. SROs also receive training specific to their school assignment either through the National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO) and/or the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center (KLETC). SROs also participate in any training provided by the school districts specific to their assignments.
If law enforcement is used in schools, implement policies that restrict SROs from addressing student discipline or enforcing school rules. OPPD SRO’s do not engage in discipline and are present to mentor students as well as conduct law enforcement activities within the school community.  It is one of the purest forms of community policing.
Support and finance the use of mobile crisis response models, including co-responder and virtual co-responder models to assist law enforcement in responding to behavioral health calls and stops. The OPPD has been a pioneer in the co-responder arena and has continued to grow the program with the addition of the Overland Park Crisis Action Team (OPCAT) Unit which includes six co-responders and twelve CIT officers that comprise a full-time Behavioral Health Unit.
Increase use of Mental Health First Aid Training, Crisis Intervention Training, and other behavioral health trainings for new and existing officers. The OPPD has received the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) One MInd Campaign designation.  All OPPD commissioned officers are Mental Health First Aid certified, and the goal is to have all commissioned officers CIT certified.  Currently, more than half of all officers are CIT trained.  In addition, de-escalation training has been incorporated into our mandatory training requirements for all officers.
Build relationships between local governments, law enforcement agencies, and other entities to provide robust behavioral services in communities. The OPPD has had a long standing relationship with Johnson County Mental Health.  This is evidenced by the vibrant co-responder program as well as our regular interactions regarding peer support, crisis intervention, and other programs. OPPD also has a law-enforcement based victim specialist who is available to victims of crimes, including children, and can connect victims to various service providers to meet their specific needs using a trauma-informed approach.
8 Can't Wait

8 Can’t Wait is a movement that offers recommendations for police reform.

Overland Park Police Department’s policies generally align what is recommended, with differences that promote public safety and support best practices in policing.

Municipal Equality Index

Each year, the Human Rights Council issues Overland Park a Municipal Equality Index scorecard.

The scorecard examines how inclusive municipal laws, policies, and services are of LGBTQ+ people who live and work there. While most ratings are based on overall City scores, The Human Rights Council regularly recognizes Overland Park for its inclusive efforts in law enforcement, including reporting of hate crime statistics to the FBI.

Related Policies

School Resource Officers

Overland Park school resource officers are sworn members of the Police Department who serve in middle and high schools in the city. They work in conjunction with school administration, security staff, and teachers to ensure a safe learning environment for everyone.

Training

In addition to minimum department training, school resource officers receive training specific to their school assignment either through the National Association of school resource officers and/or the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center. School resource officers also participate in any training provided by the school districts specific to their assignments.

Role + Duties

School resource officers have additional duties such as teaching, counseling, and safety plan development. They do not engage in districts’ disciplinary processes. 

School resource officers foster positive relationships with students while serving as a resource by giving presentations on alcohol and drug abuse and a variety of other related topics.

Related Policies

Training

Training is ongoing throughout the career of Overland Park Police Department staff members. Our training program consists of initial training, in-service training, and other ongoing professional development training opportunities.

Initial Training

Under Kansas state law, all new police officers must receive their basic law enforcement training within one year of being hired. New officers without prior law enforcement certification will attend the Johnson County Regional Police Academy, a satellite program of the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center.  The Johnson County Regional Police Academy is located on the campus of the Johnson County Community College, and is operated in cooperation with the Johnson County Police Chiefs and Sheriffs Association. Successful completion of the 16-week academy results in certification as a Kansas law enforcement officer.  

The Overland Park Police Department supplements the basic police academy training with pre-academy training and post-academy training, when Overland Park officers are provided an orientation and trained by internal staff on City-specific policies, department written directives, department-specific firearms and defensive tactics training, de-escalation, report writing, department expectations and more.

Upon successful completion of required academy training and pre-academy training and post-academy training, all new officers, including officers making lateral moves from other departments, enter our field training and evaluation program, where they are paired with a senior officer known as a field training officer, for at least 12 weeks divided into four phases.  The trainee is provided on-the-job training while being evaluated daily on 31 different standard evaluation categories. The field training and evaluation program has task lists the trainee must perform to ensure they have experienced a full range of calls for service and expectations of a police officer, as well as weekly exams to test their knowledge of policies, procedures, and laws. The field training and evaluation program is regularly updated and coordinated by a police captain, who is responsible for the overall success of the program.

Upon successful completion of the field training and evaluation program, officers are on probation for one year, a duration that starts when they are assigned to solo patrol on a team of officers and supervised by a sergeant. The sergeant meets regularly with the new officer and conducts a probationary performance evaluation every two months. 

In-Service Training

Kansas law requires all certified law enforcement officers in the state to have at least 40 hours of annual in-service training.  Officers must also qualify at least annually with their firearm on the Kansas Commission on Peace Officers’ Standards and Training statewide firearms qualification course of fire. Kansas law requires law enforcement officers to attend annual racial or other biased-based policing training. All commissioned members of the Overland Park Police Department have satisfied these training requirements.

During the 2021 state training year, the department reported a minimum average of 40 training hours per commissioned member. 

Ongoing Professional Development Training

There are many professional development opportunities throughout the career of an Overland Park Police Department commissioned member. OPPD has prioritized Crisis Intervention Team training for all officers. Early in an officer’s career, there are many training opportunities designed to enhance each officer’s skills and abilities and compliment their interests, such as training to become an evidence technician, interviewing and interrogation techniques, fair and impartial policing, domestic violence services, de-escalation and negotiation, DUI investigation and more.

Officers who aspire to be leaders in the department are encouraged to take courses in leadership and supervision.  There are also opportunities to attend the University of Kansas’ Emerging Leaders program, as well as the City’s internal talent development program.

Related Policies

Standards of Conduct + Standard Operating Procedures

In order for our practices to be as transparent as possible, the Overland Park Police Department provides online access to department policies and procedures.

These written standards and policies are just the beginning of the education, training and development our staff receive. While it is not possible to anticipate every situation that may arise or prescribe a course of action for all scenarios these policies serve as guidance and requirements to direct officers’ actions.

Police Department Standards of Conduct + Standard Operating Procedures

Standards of Conduct

Standards of Conduct set the foundations for how the department expects its employees to act while performing their duties. All Overland Park Police Department Standards of Conduct are linked here.

Standards of Conduct

Standard Operating Procedures

Standard Operating Procedures prescribe how officers and Police Department staff will handle specific scenarios and situations related to police work. These documents are used as an official guide to outline procedures for many of the routine and infrequent operations performed by Police Department staff.

All Standard Operating Procedures are listed below. Most policies are linked, however, some operating policies that prescribe specific processes and tactics for handling emergency security situations and highly sensitive investigative scenarios are not included. Policies that have not been included are noted. Policies that are under review are noted as such and will be updated in the future.

Standard Operating Procedures

Table of Contents
Overland Park Police Department
Standards of Conduct and Standard Operating Procedures
SOC TOPIC
100 OATH OF HONOR/CODE OF ETHICS
110 CHAIN OF COMMAND
120 MEMBERS CONDUCT
140 CONDUCT UNBECOMING
150 CONFIDENTIAL & SENSITIVE INFO
160 CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS
170 DECISION MAKING & JUDGEMENT
180 DUTIES IN THE FACE OF DANGER
190 EQUIPMENT CONTROL & MAINTENANCE
200 HONESTY AND TRUTHFULNESS
210 ILLEGAL ACTIONS AND DUTY TO NOTIFY
220 KNOWLEDGE & COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS AND REGULATIONS
230 OFFICIAL MISCONDUCT
240 PROBATIONARY OFFICERS LIMITATIONS
250 REPORTING FOR DUTY
260 SAFETY
270 SUPERVISORY EXPECTATIONS & RESPONSIBILITIES
280 TESTIMONY
290 INSUBORDINATION
SOP TOPIC
1010 FOREWARD
1020 ALTERNATIVE DUTY
1030 AED PROCEDURES
1040 BLASTING AND EXPLOSIVES PERMITS
1050 BUILDING SECURITY (Not for public release)
1060 CHAPLAIN PROGRAM
1070 CITY LICENSE RECORDS CHECK
1080 DEPARTMENT FIREARMS AND FIREARMS TRAINING
1100 EVACUATION OF POLICE FACILITIES (Not for public release)
1110 FAMILY SUPPORT FOR INJURED OR DECEASED
MEMBERS AND FORMAL FUNERAL PLAN
1130 FINGERPRINTS, PHOTOGRAPHS AND
IDENTIFICATION OF ARRESTED PERSONS
1140 JUVENILE CONTACTS, ARREST, AND DETENTION
1150 MEDIA POLICY
1160 MOTOR POOL PROCEDURES
1170 NON-BIASED BASED POLICING
1180 OFFICER INVOLVED SHOOTING INVESTIGATION
1190 SCHEDULES, LEAVES, AND OVERTIME
1210 POLYGRAPH EXAMINATIONS
1220 YEAR-END APPRAISALS AND PROBATIONARY EVALUATIONS
1230 PRISONER TRANSFERS AND RESTRAINTS
1240 CITIZEN COMPLAINT AND INTERNAL AFFAIRS INVESTIGATIONS
1250 SCHOOL CROSSING GUARDS (Currently under review)
1260 OUTSIDE EMPLOYMENT
1270 SENIORITY DETERMINATION
1280 TOWS AND IMPOUNDS
1290 TRAINING PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES
1300 CAREER BOARD
1320 VEHICLE MAINTENANCE USE
1330 MOTORIST ASSIST PROGRAM
1340 VOLUNTEER PROGRAM
1350 WRITTEN DIRECTIVE SYSTEM
1360 FLOODING
1370 STORM WARNING PROCEDURES
1380 USE OF CITY AND DEPARTMENT IMAGES,
RECORDINGS AND LOGOS IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN
1390 DISCIPLINE
1420 UNIFORMS AND APPEARANCE
1430 TATTOOS, PIERCINGS AND BODY MODIFICATIONS
1440 CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANAGEMENT
1450 PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAM
1460 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
1470 PEER SUPPORT PROGRAM (Currently under review)
1480 PERSONNEL EARLY WARNING SYSTEM (Currently under review)
1490 LONG TERM MILITARY DEPLOYMENT AND REINTEGRATION
1500 PROMOTIONAL PROCESS
1510 DEPARTMENT STRUCTURE
2010 TRAFFIC CRASH INVESTIGATIONS
2020 ANIMAL CONTROL PROCEDURES
2030 ARREST AND DETENTION
2040 ARREST WARRANTS
2050 BOMBS, THREATS, AND EXPLOSIVES
2060 CANINE UNIT
2070 CIVIL DISTURBANCE AND CROWD CONTROL PLAN (Not for public release)
2080 COURT APPEARANCES AND SUBPOENAS
2090 CARE OF PERSONS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS AND INDIVIDUALS INCAPACITATED BY ALCOHOL OR DRUGS
2100 DIVERSION AND PROBATION
2110 DOMESTIC VIOLANCE AND STALKING
2115 DUI ARREST
2120 EMERGENCY DRIVING
2130 EQUIPMENT CONTROL AND STORAGE ROOMS
2140 FIELD TRAINING PROGRAM
2150 MISSING PERSONS, RUNAWAYS AND ALERTS
2160 AUDIO & VIDEO RECORDINGS
2170 MOBILE COMMAND POST PROCEDURES
2180 NOISE FLASH DIVERSION DEVICES
2190 OPERATION OF SPEED MEASURING DEVICES
2200 PERFORMANCE RECOGNITION
2210 PURSUIT DRIVING AND STOPPING MEASURES
2220 REPORT WRITING
2230 RESPONDING TO ALARMS (Not for public release)
2240 RIDE ALONG PROGRAM / POLICE FACILITY
2260 SCHOOL RESOURCE UNIT
2270 SPECIAL EVENTS
2280 STOLEN AND MISSING VEHICLES AND LICENSE PLATES
2290 STOP & FRISK AND SEARCH & SEIZURE
2330 RESPONSE TO RESISTANCE
2340 VEHICLE LOCKOUTS
2350 TRAFFIC INCIDENT MANAGEMENT
2370 LICENSE PLATE RECOGNITION/READER
2380 ACTIVE THREATS (Not for public release)
2390 MOTOR VEHICLE STOPS
2400 TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT
2450 PUSH BUMPERS
3010 SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS
3020 ARSON INVESTIGATION
3030 BONDING PROCEDURES
3040 CHILD ABUSE INVESTIGATION
3060 COMPUTER, REJIS, KCJIS, & NCIC USE
3065 NCIC VALIDATIONS AND NICS
3070 CRIME SCENE DUTIES AND CRIME LAB OPERATIONS
3080 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS
3090 VICTIM SPECIALIST
3100 CRIMINAL HISTORY AND REPORT DISSEMINATIONS
3110 DEATH INVESTIGATION
3120 DRUG BUYS
3130 ELECTRONIC TRACKING SYSTEMS (Not for public release)
3140 FEE COLLECTIONS AND ACCOUNTING
3150 FINANCIAL CRIMES / IDENTITY THEFT
3170 HANDLING OF CBRNE THREATS
3180 INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEMS
3190 INFORMANTS
3200 LINEUPS AND SHOW UPS
3210 METRO SQUAD ASSIGNMENTS
3220 PERSONNEL CALLBACKS
3230 POLICE DEPARTMENT MAIL PROCEDURES
3240 PROPERTY SEIZURES / FORFEITURES / DRUG TAX
3250 PROPERTY
3260 RADIO AND MDT DISPATCH PROCEDURES (Currently under review)
3270 SPECIAL SERVICE ACCOUNT
3290 QUESTIONING ADVISORIES
3300 PRESCRIPTION DRUG COLLECTION PROGRAM
3310 PERSONNEL HIRING
3315 ANNUAL RECRUITMENT PLAN & ANALYSIS REPORT
3320 CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE
3330 FACIAL RECOGNITION